“We Were Soldiers”

Playing Saturday, January 23, 2016 at 10:15 A.M.

 

Showing in the Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum Movie Theatre, Saturday at 1015 hours, January 23rd, 2016: WE WERE SOLDIERS

In recognition of the 43rd anniversary of the Vietnam “peace accord”, this movie is being shown as a tribute to the courage and honor of our Vietnam veterans. The impact of that conflict brought about a dramatic change in American Society, and Policy, still being felt today.....

In a place soon to be known as The Valley of Death, in a football field-sized clearing called landing zone X-Ray, Lt. Colonel Hal Moore and 400 young troopers from the newly formed 1/7th Cavalry Regiment of the US 1st Air cavalry Division were surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers dug into the tunnel warren mountainside. The ensuing battle was one of the most savage in U.S. history and is portrayed here as the signal encounter between the American and North Vietnamese armies. We Were Soldiers Once... And Young is a tribute to the nobility of those men under fire, their common acts of uncommon valor, and their loyalty to and love for one another. - Written by PHD in CT USA

Admission is by donation, and appreciated. This film is one in a series shown monthly to educate our visitors on the sacrifices made, for us, by our WWII generation. Free popcorn will be served.

 

 

“Wake Island”

Playing Saturday, January 30, 2016 at 10:15 A.M.

 

Showing in the Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum Movie Theatre, Saturday at 1015 hours, January 30th, 2016: WAKE ISLAND

The winner of four Oscar nominations, Wake Island was one of the first major Hollywood films to deal with America’s forced participation in World War II. The first two reels takes place in the weeks prior to

Pearl Harbor, as Wake Island military commander Brian Donlevy carries on a friendly rivalry with Seabee supervisor Albert Dekker. Once the US is in the shooting war, all previous differences are forgotten and the Wake Island personnel begin pulling together. Despite being heavily outnumbered during the subsequent Japanese attack on Wake, the Americans put up a valiant fight, at great cost to the Imperial Forces. In a scene calculated to evoke long, loud cheers from the audience, Donlevy, weary and battle-stained, relays to the American mainland the legendary (if offensive) challenge “Send us more Japs!” As in the like-vintage, the military defeat of the Americans is treated-and justifiably so--as a moral victory. Utilizing some of the top male talents in Paramount’s contract pool-Donlevy, Dekker Robert Preston, MacDonald Carey, William Bendix--Wake Island remains an excellent example of propaganda-as-entertainment ~ Hal Erickson,Rovi

Admission is by donation, and appreciated. This film is one in a series shown monthly to educate our visitors on the sacrifices made, for us, by our WWII generation. Free popcorn will be served.